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Tardy reflections on the election

My current column is online at Catholic World Report. Instead of talking about the stupid party and the evil party I talk about the party that believes in nothing and the party that believes in Nothing, but it comes to the same thing.

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Catholics and cultural assimilation

I have a piece up at the Crisis website on the topic. Not surprisingly, I say the culture should assimilate to Catholics rather than the reverse.

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Turning the corner

My column for Catholic World Report, on the need to expand what can be talked about in public life, is now up.

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Out of the wreckage

I have another piece on the Sixties up at Crisis Magazine. It orginally started with an epigraph from The Doctrine of the Mean by Confucius that got ditched because the site software couldn’t accommodate it:

“The ancients who wished to illustrate illustrious virtue throughout the empire, first ordered well their own states. Wishing to order well their states, they first regulated their families. Wishing to regulate their families, they first cultivated their persons. Wishing to cultivate their persons, they first rectified their hearts. Wishing to rectify their hearts, they first sought to be sincere in their thoughts. Wishing to be sincere in their thoughts, they first extended to the utmost their knowledge.”

The epigraph was the source of the “solid advice” I refer to about the middle of the piece.

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The historical roots of 1960s radicalism

My latest piece at Crisis Magazine explains the Sixties as a stage of modernization (not necessarily a good thing).

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An undemocratic future?

My latest column is now online at Catholic World Report under that title. It’s a review of After Tocqueville by Chilton Williamson.

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The Church and Social Programs

That’s the title of my latest at Catholic World Report. For people in the thick of things it can look like enterprises like Obamacare would make a lot of things better, but the overall picture is more troubling.

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The state and the sacred

Here’s another column at Catholic World Report, this one on the essential sacredness of the state. If you say “no, the state is simply practical” then some aspect of the simply practical will become sacred.

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Looking back on the Sixties

I have a new piece up at Crisis on the illusion and reality of the Sixties. What people expected to be liberation and soaring horizons turned out to be the rise to power of a severely flawed ruling class.

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Feminism and Catholicism

I continue my assault on equality, with a piece on feminism at Crisis.

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Equality and Catholicism

I have yet another piece at Catholic World Report, this one on equality and Catholicism. It points out that the progressive understanding of equality is at odds with Catholicism, good sense, good order, human well-being, and what not else, because it demands the abolition of all significant social institutions other than global markets and expert bureaucracies.

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The necessity of artistic counterrevolution

My friend Nikos Salingaros, together with Mark Signorelli, develops and adds to some thoughts he and I kicked around in an interview and a short essay we did together last year: The Tyranny of Artistic Modernism. The basic argument is that artistic modernism is antihuman, tyrannical, and nihilistic in its essence, and must be overthrown. No compromise is possible.

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The Left, the Right, and Catholicism

My latest at Catholic World Report is about left liberals, right liberals, and what to do about them.

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In the Middle of the Journey

My latest column at Catholic World Report goes into various flip-flops in the Catholic Church’s attitude toward secular powers. There are no perfect answers, but clear-headedness is good, and maybe the Church is righting herself from the extreme optimism of the post-Vatican II period.

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Chain comments and the good life

On other fronts, Larry Auster posted a comment by me on a comment by Robert Spencer on a comment by Larry on a comment by Spencer on a canceled concert in Indonesia. How’s that for intertextuality? (The comment by me does have an actual topic, social understandings of the good.)

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Mixing it up over Maistre

An old libertarian friend, Todd Seavey, posted an entry in his blog regarding The Works of Joseph de Maistre that complained about Maistre and mentioned me, so in response I posted a couple of comments that I think make sense even apart from the original setting. The point at issue, as you will see, was Maistre’s sometimes startling emphasis on the role of violence in human life.

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Freedom and the political good

I have a piece by that name (subtitled “some preliminary considerations”) up at the Liberty Law Blog.

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What is the etiology of liberalism?

The question seems important, since where liberalism comes from affects how we should deal with it and where it is likely to go. Many right-wingers, for example, think of it as psychological or instrumental: people are liberals because they feel this way or that, or because they want to get money, power, status, or whatever. Such views suggest that liberalism need not be taken seriously on its own terms, and will disappear when events shift the balance of advantages or put people in a different mood.

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Liberalism, Catholicism, and the Good

I have another column, this one on liberal and Catholic conceptions of the good and the just, at Catholic World Report.

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More on freedom and tyranny

That’s the original title of my latest column at Catholic World Report. It’s basically an argument that Catholics shouldn’t base their political arguments on freedom, they should base them on substantive goods. (I don’t know what it shows that they renamed it “Tyranny, Religion, and the Fight for Freedom.”)

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