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Where's this headed?

In a blog entry at Catholic World Report, I comment on incipient second thoughts about the direction liberalism is going from Democratic commentator Kirsten Powers.

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How religious is natural law?

In the Crisis piece mentioned in the previous entry, I suggested the relationship between the two was ambiguous. A blogger who wants to maintain a strong distinction between natural law and religion called me on it, so I had to develop my thoughts a little.

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Socrates among the sophists

I have a brace of new pieces up, one at Crisis Magazine about how bad ideological pluralism is and one at Catholic World Report on Socratic questioning as a weapon against technocracy.

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Lent and technocracy

Those are the topics of my two most recent online columns, one at Crisis Magazine about how to infuse politics with a bit more soul, and one at Catholic World Report about why the Church can’t possibly use modern public language to speak to modern man.

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Rebuilding Christendom

I make the pitch for mild Catholic separatism in my current column at Catholic World Report.

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Arguing over argument

There’s a new piece I wrote at Crisis Magazine about snark and willful stupidity on the Internet, and the importance of plugging imperturbably away.

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More on subsidiarity

I have an additional piece on the topic up at Catholic World Report. The basic point is extra ecclesiam nulla subsidiaritas. You’re not going to get subsidiarity apart from an understanding of the world that doesn’t seem to exist in secular public thought today.

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What is normal?

That’s the issue considered in my latest column at Catholic World Report. The big question today is whether the expression means much of anything.

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Will the Church return to type?

That’s the original title of my latest piece at Crisis Magazine. It says that the dispute between progressive and traditionalist Catholics is a dispute over whether the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church has an essential nature.

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Inclusiveness and Crisis, part II

Crisis has published the second part of my two-part piece on inclusiveness.

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Subsidiarity

That’s the topic of my latest column at Catholic World Report.

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Inclusiveness and Crisis, part I

Crisis Magazine has published the first part of a two-part piece on inclusiveness that gives a thumbnail sketch of the argument of my recent book on the topic.

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The end of generic conservatism

That’s the subject of my most recent piece at Crisis Magazine.

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The Return of Christendom

That’s the title of my latest column at Catholic World Report. It tells us that Christendom is always with us.

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De mulieribus Americanis

A common claim among dissatisfied men is that American women are the worst. European women, it is said, are are more feminine, less self-centered, and less concerned with their careers than their American counterparts.

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Men's and women's "starter marriages"

The differences between the sexes I discussed a couple of posts ago come out in the differing uses of “starter husband” and “starter wife.”

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Sex in the city, or wherever

Changes in sexual mores resulting from the lesser practical importance of marriage in a radically commercialized and bureaucratized society make the situation described in the last post quite a bit worse.

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Weird chix and loser doodz

The single most suggestive thing I’ve read about the sexes is this press release from some neurologists. Basically, it says that intelligence in men mostly matches up with gray matter in the brain and intelligence in women with white matter. So when men and women feel the uncontrollable urge to put the word “brain” in quotation marks when speaking about the opposite sex there’s something to it.

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Before the asteroid hit

Within living memory it was possible to talk about the sexes in an intelligent and civilized way. As proof here are some pages from The Viking Book of Aphorisms, edited by W. H. Auden and Louis Kronenberger. The collection was published in 1962, the year before sex was invented (according to Philip Larkin). It’s hard to imagine it could have come out much later than that.

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Love and marriage?

What’s with the sexes these days?

Questions about sex and the sexes are never really answerable, but people do notice things, and some of them seem illuminating, so an occasional comment is in order.

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