You are here

Sex in the city, or wherever

Changes in sexual mores resulting from the lesser practical importance of marriage in a radically commercialized and bureaucratized society make the situation described in the last post quite a bit worse.

Share/Save

Weird chix and loser doodz

The single most suggestive thing I’ve read about the sexes is this press release from some neurologists. Basically, it says that intelligence in men mostly matches up with gray matter in the brain and intelligence in women with white matter. So when men and women feel the uncontrollable urge to put the word “brain” in quotation marks when speaking about the opposite sex there’s something to it.

Share/Save

Before the asteroid hit

Within living memory it was possible to talk about the sexes in an intelligent and civilized way. As proof here are some pages from The Viking Book of Aphorisms, edited by W. H. Auden and Louis Kronenberger. The collection was published in 1962, the year before sex was invented (according to Philip Larkin). It’s hard to imagine it could have come out much later than that.

Share/Save

Love and marriage?

What’s with the sexes these days?

Questions about sex and the sexes are never really answerable, but people do notice things, and some of them seem illuminating, so an occasional comment is in order.

Share/Save

Existence as violence

A correspondent referred me to a post by a “progressive Christian” blogger as a sign of a new frontier in inclusiveness. The post picked up on another blogger’s claim that “the self is inherently violent.” The example used was blogging, which involves self-assertion that comes at the expense of other bloggers.

Share/Save

The demise of rational public discourse

That’s the topic of my latest piece at Crisis Magazine.

Share/Save

All sex all the time!

Not quite, but I do have a new column up at Catholic World Report on Sex and the Public Order.

Share/Save

A highly acceptable man

The following review of Robert P. George’s Conscience and Its Enemies appeared in the October 2013 Chronicles:

Share/Save

More reviews

There have been a couple more reviews by bloggers of my new book Against Inclusiveness, one by Kidist Asrat at her site Reclaiming Beauty and one by Jeff Culbreath at the group blog What’s Wrong with the World.

Share/Save

Lunacy doesn't last forever

For some reason people find my new piece at Crisis optimistic. I’d say rather that it refuses to be pessimistic: disaster is never absolute, it doesn’t last forever, and it may not go as far as feared, so don’t give up.

Share/Save

The Church and the experts

I have a new column up at Catholic World Report about the troubled relation between the Church and those who define reality in the secular world, and what to do about it.

Share/Save

Against Inclusiveness now available as an e-book

My new book is now available in the Kindle and Nook formats.

Share/Save

My new book gets reviewed

I get my first review, at Catholic World Report, from someone other than an individual blogger. The review, by Jerry Salyer, starts off with an interesting quote from an instruction on liberation theology by then-Cardinal Ratzinger.

Share/Save

Review of Garry Wills' Why Priests?

The following review of Garry’s Will’s Why Priests? appeared in the June 2013 Chronicles:

Garry Wills identifies himself as a Christian. He says he accepts the creeds, along with prayer, divine providence, the Gospels, the Eucharist, and the Mystical Body of Christ as the body of all believers. He thinks it a bad thing that “article by article, parts of the Creed are fading from some churches.” He also identifies as a Catholic, and tells us he prays the rosary and is devoted to the saints.

Share/Save

Where is all this leading?

My latest at Catholic World Report suggests that secular liberalism won’t have the staying power effectually to suppress Catholicism.

Share/Save

The darkness gathers

I have another piece on the Windsor decision, this one at Crisis Magazine. It deals with the increasing radicalism, mindlessness, and intolerance of mainstream progressive thought.

Share/Save

Out of the antiworld

Here’s an essay from the current issue of Modern Age that’s been posted at the Intercollegiate Review website. It gives an architectonic account of all possible political positions in present-day America that explains the necessity and awkward status of social conservatism. The piece started out as a lecture I gave a couple of years ago at a Catholic conference and then shortened and made a bit less papist to fit into an officially non-Catholic publication.

Share/Save

Is inclusiveness evil?

That’s the title given to a a piece I wrote for Intercollegiate Review. It basically says that the Windsor case (invalidating the federal definition of marriage as natural marriage) means everyone should read my new book Against Inclusiveness, and includes a thumbnail sketch of the book’s argument and how it applies to churches.

Share/Save

Religion, liberalism, and worldly success

My latest column is now up at Catholic World Report. Basically it presents a standard cyclical view of one aspect of history: a society with a good religion will become successful, which makes the religion lose its hold, which means the society will stop being successful.

Share/Save

The radical meaning of "gay marriage"

That’s the title of my most recent piece at Crisis Magazine. It discusses recent developments in connection with the trend toward a single universal regime of contract and regulation in which no point has privileged independence.

Share/Save

Pages

Subscribe to Turnabout RSS